Science

Departmental approach to the curriculum

The science department aims to ensure we maintain students naturally inquisitive minds throughout their time at Rickmansworth School. Science offers lots to explore through important discussions about our world and excellent  practicals incorporated into their learning. Science gives young people necessary lifelong skills as it encourages them to think, analyse and evaluate information. 

 

As a specialist science college, we have 10 science labs, 2 demo labs and a computer lab. We also have 11 science teachers and 3 science technicians to ensure students get the best experience during their science lessons.

At KS3, students follow a broad and exciting syllabus, deepening their knowledge of how science works and learning through questioning and investigation

At KS4, students take AQA separate sciences or AQA combined: trilogy. Students are taught in groups according to their exam entry and we offer extensive support and guidance to help students revise effectively and succeed. Students are given access to a selection of online resources to help guide their learning, alongside their revision guides, workbooks and exam practice packs. 

We have a high number of students who continue studying the sciences at KS5 with great success, many of them attending Oxbridge or Russell Group Universities to read the sciences. 


 

Long Term Curriculum Overviews

Year 7

In Year 7 Science, pupils will study a range of different topics that explore concepts from Biology, Chemistry and Physics in everyday contexts.

In this first year of secondary school science, there is an emphasis on skills; both procedural laboratory skills such as using Bunsen Burners, and ‘working scientifically’ skills such as devising appropriate practical procedures and drawing conclusions from data. Students are regularly given the opportunity to develop their literacy, numeracy and ICT skills within lessons.

Year 7 students are generally taught by one teacher across all three sciences. Students are taught in mixed ability form groups for this year in order to ease the transition from Key Stage 2.

Students will follow the following topics in Year 7:

 

 

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

 

Term 1

First 2 weeks: An Introduction To Science and Working Scientifically. They will also complete a baseline assessment.

7B1 Cells

7C1 Solids, Liquids and Gases

7P1 Energy

Term 2

7B2 Reproduction

7C2 Elements, Compounds and Molecules

7P2 Electricity

Term 3

7B3 Movement

7C3 Separating Mixtures

7P3 Forces

 

Assessment:

Longer topics will have a Mid-topic assessments. These track and develop skills such as graph drawing, using data to draw conclusions, and extended writing. These assessments are not awarded a grade or level, and are primarily an opportunity for feedback and development.

End of topic tests give students an opportunity to demonstrate all the knowledge they have gained throughout the unit. This is completed using the students’ devices and reviewed by their teachers. These tests are graded and help to make up part of their termly report.

The End of Year 7 Test consolidates all the learning from the year in one hour long exam. This will play a large role in determining science sets in Year 8.

Year 8

In Year 8 Science, students are continuing to build their core KS3 knowledge and skills, using what they have learned in Year 7 to further explain the world around them. 

In Biology students will use their understanding of specialised cells to discuss the workings of several organ systems and how they work together to deliver oxygen and glucose to respiring cells.

In Chemistry, students will be using their knowledge of particles and the periodic table to learn about chemical reactions and how to write these as chemical formulae.

In Physics, students will use their knowledge of energy stores and particles to describe the movement of particles through space and matter.

Year 8 students are generally taught by one teacher across all three sciences. Students are taught in upper and lower bands, and will be further split into sets in Year 9.

 

 

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Term 1

8B1 - Ecology

8C1 - Chemical Reactions 

8P1 - Waves

Term 2

8B2 - Photosynthesis and Respiration

8C2 - Metals and Metal Reactions

8P2 - The Particle Model

Term 3

8B3 - Breathing and Circulation

8C3 - Rocks

8P3 - Space

 

Assessments:

Longer topics will have a Mid-topic assessments. These track and develop skills such as graph drawing, using data to draw conclusions, and extended writing. These assessments are not awarded a grade or level, and are primarily an opportunity for feedback and development.

End of topic tests give students an opportunity to demonstrate all the knowledge they have gained throughout the unit. This is completed using the students’ devices and reviewed by their teachers. These tests are graded and help to make up part of their termly report.

Year 8s will have one final End-of-Year Test consolidating all their learning from both Year 7 and Year 8 in one hour long exam. This will play a large role in determining science sets for Year 9.

Year 9

In Year 9, we focus on the more difficult concepts of KS3 science, such as natural selection, patterns in the periodic table, and balanced forces. Once students have completed all KS3 topics, we have a few weeks of guided revision, helping students to consolidate all of their learning from across Year 7, Year 8 and Year 9.

Following this revision, all students will sit an End of Key-Stage exam for Science in March. This is earlier than the Y9 exams for other subjects which take place in the summer term. This is so that we can use the results from these exams to help students decide which GCSE science pathway is most suitable for them. With the new Science GCSEs being more challenging than in the previous framework, at Rickmansworth School, we start students on the KS4 content part-way through Year 9, in order to best prepare them for their GCSEs. 

 

 

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Term 1

9B1 - Variation

9C1 - Trends and Reactions

9P1 Force Fields

Term 2

9B2 - Health and Disease

9C2 - Materials

9P2 Machines

Term 3

Starting GCSE Curriculum

Bioenergetics

Starting GCSE Curriculum

Chemistry of the Atmosphere

Starting GCSE Curriculum

Energy

Assessments:

Longer topics will have a Mid-topic assessments. These track and develop skills such as graph drawing, using data to draw conclusions, and extended writing. These assessments are not awarded a grade or level, and are primarily an opportunity for feedback and development.

End of topic tests give students an opportunity to demonstrate all the knowledge they have gained throughout the unit. This is completed using the students’ devices and reviewed by their teachers. These tests are graded and help to make up part of their termly report.

Year 9s will have a final End of Key Stage 3 Test in Term 2, consolidating all their learning from Year 7 to Year 9. This will play a large role in determining whether students are recommended for taking separate sciences at GCSE level.

Year 10 and 11

Combined Science: Trilogy (2 GCSEs)

Biology: This is broken into 7 topics, detailed below. Students are assessed on Biology with two exams. Paper 1 assesses Topics 1-4 and Paper 2 assesses Topics 5-7. 

Students start the Biology GCSE in Year 9. The first topic they study is:

 

Topic 4 - Bioenergetics. This topic provides key Biological fundamentals that almost all the remaining topics build upon. Plants harness the Sun’s energy in photosynthesis to make glucose. This process releases oxygen. Both animals and plants use this oxygen to oxidise glucose in a process called aerobic respiration which transfers the energy that the organism needs to perform its functions. Conversely, anaerobic respiration does not require oxygen to transfer energy. During vigorous exercise the human body is unable to supply the cells with sufficient oxygen and it switches to anaerobic respiration. This process will supply energy but also causes the build-up of lactic acid in muscles which causes fatigue.

 

In year 10 students will study the following topics:

 

Topic 1 - Cell Biology

Cells are the basic unit of all forms of life. Structural differences between types of cells enables them to perform specific functions within the organism. These differences in cells are controlled by genes in the nucleus. For an organism to grow, cells must divide by mitosis producing two new identical cells. If cells are isolated at an early stage of growth before they have become too specialised, they can retain their ability to grow into a range of different types of cells. This phenomenon has led to the development of stem cell technology. This is a new branch of medicine that allows doctors to repair damaged organs by growing new tissue from stem cells.

 

Topic 2 - Organisation

The human digestive system provides the body with nutrients. The respiratory system provides it with oxygen and removes carbon dioxide. In each case they provide dissolved materials that need to be moved quickly around the body in the blood by the circulatory system. Damage to any of these systems can be debilitating if not fatal. Although there has been huge progress in surgical techniques, especially with regard to coronary heart disease, many interventions would not be necessary if individuals reduced their risks through improved diet and lifestyle. We will also learn how the plant’s transport system is dependent on environmental conditions to ensure that leaf cells are provided with the water and carbon dioxide that they need for photosynthesis

 

Topic 3 - Infection and Response

Pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that cause infectious diseases in animals and plants. They depend on their host to provide the conditions and nutrients that they need to grow and reproduce. They frequently produce toxins that damage tissues and make us feel ill. This section will explore how we can avoid diseases by reducing contact with them, as well as how the body uses barriers against pathogens. Once inside the body our immune system is triggered which is usually strong enough to destroy the pathogen and prevent disease. When at risk from unusual or dangerous diseases our body’s natural system can be enhanced by the use of vaccination. Since the 1940s a range of antibiotics have been developed which have proved successful against a number of lethal diseases caused by bacteria. Unfortunately many groups of bacteria have now become resistant to these antibiotics. The race is now on to develop a new set of antibiotics.

 

Topic 5 - Homeostasis and Response. This topic will be covered at the end of year 10 and the start of year 11. 

Cells in the body can only survive within narrow physical and chemical limits. They require a constant temperature and pH as well as a constant supply of dissolved food and water. In order to do this the body requires control systems that constantly monitor and adjust the composition of the blood and tissues. These control systems include receptors which sense changes and effectors that bring about changes. In this section we will explore the structure and function of the nervous system and how it can bring about fast responses. We will also explore the hormonal system which usually brings about much slower changes. Hormonal coordination is particularly important in reproduction since it controls the menstrual cycle. An understanding of the role of hormones in reproduction has allowed scientists to develop not only contraceptive drugs but also drugs which can increase fertility.

 

In year 11, after completing topic 5, students will cover the following topics:

 

Topic 6 - Inheritance, Variation and Evolution

The number of chromosomes are halved during meiosis and then combined with new genes from the sexual partner to produce unique offspring. Gene mutations occur continuously and on rare occasions can affect the functioning of the animal or plant. These mutations may be damaging and lead to a number of genetic disorders or death. Very rarely a new mutation can be beneficial and consequently, lead to increased fitness in the individual. Variation generated by mutations and sexual reproduction is the basis for natural selection; this is how species evolve. An understanding of these processes has allowed scientists to intervene through selective breeding to produce livestock with favoured characteristics. Once new varieties of plants or animals have been produced it is possible to clone individuals to produce larger numbers of identical individuals all carrying the favourable characteristic. Scientists have now discovered how to take genes from one species and introduce them into the genome of another by a process called genetic engineering. In spite of the huge potential benefits that this technology can offer, genetic modification still remains highly controversial.

 

Topic 7 - Ecology

The Sun is a source of energy that passes through ecosystems. Materials including carbon and water are continually recycled by the living world, being released through respiration of animals, plants and decomposing microorganisms and taken up by plants in photosynthesis. All species live in ecosystems composed of complex communities of animals and plants dependent on each other and that are adapted to particular conditions, both abiotic and biotic. These ecosystems provide essential services that support human life and continued development. In order to continue to benefit from these services humans need to engage with the environment in a sustainable way. In this section we will explore how humans are threatening biodiversity as well as the natural systems that support it. We will also consider some actions we need to take to ensure our future health, prosperity and well-being.

 

Chemistry

Students will be following the AQA Trilogy Science specification. These topics are examined in two exams. Topics 1-5 are examined in Paper 1 and Topics 6-10 are examined in Paper 2. These papers are both 1 hour and 15 minutes long and are worth 70 marks.

 

The exams will test the student’s knowledge, application and analysis techniques with approximately 25% being allocated to mathematical skills and 25% related to practical skills.

 

We teach topics in a slightly different order to more evenly spread the practical work through the year and also to allow some of the the more challenging concepts to be met later in the course.

 

Year 9

  • Topic 9: Chemistry of the atmosphere

 

Year 10

  • Topic 1a: Atomic Structure

  • Topic 6: Rates and Equilibria (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 5: Energy Changes (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 2: Bonding, Structure and Properties

  • Topic 1b: The Periodic table

  • Topic 4a: Chemical Changes: Acids and Neutralisation (with Required Practical)

 

Year 11

  • Topic 3: Quantitative Chemistry

  • Topic 4b: Chemical Changes: Reactivity and Electrolysis (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 8: Chemical Analysis (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 7: Organic Chemistry

  • Topic 10: Earth’s Resources (with Required Practical)



 

Physics:

Physics

Students will be following the AQA Trilogy Science specification. These topics are examined in two exams. Topics 1-7 are examined in Paper 1 and Topics 8-13 are examined in Paper 2. These papers are both 1 hour and 15 minutes long and are worth 70 marks.

The exams will test the student’s knowledge, application and analysis techniques with approximately 25% being allocated to mathematical skills and 25% related to practical skills.

We teach topics in a slightly different order to more evenly spread the practical work through the year and also to allow some of the the more challenging concepts to be met later in the course.


Year 9

  • Topic 1: Energy conservation and dissipation

Year 10

  • Topic 2: Energy transfer by heating

  • Topic 3: Energy resources

  • Topic 4: Electric Circuits

  • Topic 5: Electricity in the home

  • Topic 6: Molecules and matter

  • Topic 7: Radioactivity

 

Year 11

  • Topic 8: Forces in balance

  • Topic 9: Motion

  • Topic 10: Force and motion

  • Topic 11: Wave properties

  • Topic 12: Electromagnetic waves

  • Topic 13: Electromagnetism

 

Separate Sciences (3 GCSEs)

 

Biology: Those studying Separate Sciences will cover the same topics in the same order as those who study combined science (see above). Students are assessed on Biology with two exams. Paper 1 assesses Topics 1-4 and Paper 2 assesses Topics 5-7. Within each topic there are a number of extra lessons, such as the Eye and the Kidney in Topic 5, or important historical figures in genetics and evolution such as Darwin, Wallace and Mendel in Topic 6.

 

Chemistry

Students will be following the AQA Chemistry specification. These topics are examined in two exams. Topics 1-5 are examined in Paper 1 and Topics 6-10 are examined in Paper 2. These papers are both 1 hour and 45 minutes long and are worth 100 marks.

 

The exams will test the student’s knowledge, application and analysis techniques with approximately 25% being allocated to mathematical skills and 25% related to practical skills.

 

We teach topics in a slightly different order to more evenly spread the practical work through the year and also to allow some of the the more challenging concepts to be met later in the course.

 

Year 9

  • Topic 9: Chemistry of the atmosphere

 

Year 10

  • Topic 1a: Atomic Structure

  • Topic 6: Rates and Equilibria (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 5: Energy Changes (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 2: Bonding, Structure and Properties

  • Topic 1b: The Periodic table

  • Topic 4a: Chemical Changes: Acids and Neutralisation (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 3: Quantitative Chemistry (with Required Practical)

 

Year 11

  • Topic 4b: Chemical Changes: Reactivity and Electrolysis (with Required Practical)

  • Topic 8: Chemical Analysis (with 2 Required Practicals)

  • Topic 7: Organic Chemistry

  • Topic 10: Earth’s Resources (with Required Practical)

 

Physics:

Those studying Separate Sciences will cover the same topics in the same order as those who study combined science (see above), plus some extra modules as details below.

Students are assessed in Physics by two exams. Paper 1 assesses Topics 1-7 and Paper 2 assesses Topics 9-16. Within each topic there are a number of extra lessons, which Combined science students would not follow.

Year 9

  • Topic 1: Energy conservation and dissipation

Year 10

  • Topic 2: Energy transfer by heating

  • Topic 3: Energy resources

  • Topic 4: Electric Circuits

  • Topic 5: Electricity in the home

  • Topic 6: Molecules and matter

  • Topic 7: Radioactivity

  • Topic 8: Forces in balance

  • Topic 9: Motion

 

Year 11

  • Topic 10: Force and motion

  • Topic 11: Force and pressure (Separate Science Only)

  • Topic 12: Wave properties

  • Topic 13: Electromagnetic waves

  • Topic 14: Light (Separate Science Only)

  • Topic 15: Electromagnetism

  • Topic 16: Space (Separate Science Only)

Year 12 and 13

Biology

Biology A-level is one of our most popular subjects at Rickmansworth School, with over 100 applicants each year. Studying Biology at A-levels will allow students to further understand the natural world around them, how organisms interact with one another, and the workings of the human body. This course opens up a wide range of career paths including pathology, medicine, zoology, conservationism, dentistry and so much more.

 

Students study the Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology A-Level (Edexcel A) course.

 

At the end of Year 13 students will be assessed across 3 papers, each 2 hours in length.

During the course students cover 8 Topics and a synoptic element in Year 13. There is no coursework element to the course, however students will be expected to pass a series of practical assessments to gain their full qualification.

 

Entry Requirements:

  • Grade 6 in GCSE Biology, or Grades 6-6 in GCSE Combined Science

  • Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics

 

Topic 1: Lifestyle, Health and Risk 

Knowledge and understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system and the importance of lifestyle choices to health. 

The role of diet and other lifestyle factors in the maintenance of good health with reference to the heart and circulation and to cardiovascular disease (CVD).

The Cardiac cycle and the structure and function of different blood vessels

The structures and functions of some carbohydrates and lipids. 

Ideas about correlation, causation and the concept of risks to health are covered. 

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Investigate the effect of caffeine on heart rate in Daphnia

  • Investigate the vitamin C content of food and drink.

 

Topic 2 Genes and Health

This topic considers the following biological principles through the context of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis:

The properties of and transport of materials across cell membranes and gas exchange surfaces. 

DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, enzymes and monohybrid inheritance through the context of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis.

The topic also allows for discussion of the social and ethical issues surrounding the genetic screening for genetic conditions.

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Investigate membrane structure, including the effect of alcohol concentration or temperature on membrane permeability.

  • Investigate the effect of enzyme and substrate concentrations on the initial rates of reactions.

 

Topic 3: Voice of the Genome

This topic follows the development of multicellular organisms from single cells to complex individuals. Cell structure and ultrastructure, Cell division, The importance of fertilisation, The roles of stem cells, gene expression, Cell differentiation, Tissue organisation.The role of the genotype, epigenetics and the effect of environment on phenotype.

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Prepare and stain a root tip squash to observe the stages of mitosis.

 

Topic 4: Biodiversity and Natural Resources

Biodiversity and the wealth of natural resources used by humans.

Why are there so many different species?

Niche and adaptation. Adaptation and natural selection and how this leads to evolution. The concerns for disappearing biodiversity and loss of potential natural resources are used to highlight the need for biologists to identify, name and classify species. The topic has sections on both traditional and novel uses of plants and plant fibres and the use of chemical extracts from animals and plants. The relationship of plant anatomy to function and the structure and role of cellulose and starch is studied. The topic ends with the issue of sustainability and the role of zoos and seed banks in conservation of endangered species. 

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Identify sclerenchyma fibres, phloem sieve tubes and xylem vessels and their location within stems through a light microscope.

  • Investigate plant mineral deficiencies. 

  • Determine the tensile strength of plant fibres.

  • Investigate the antimicrobial properties of plants, including aseptic techniques for the safe handling of bacteria.

 

Topic 5 - On the wild side

Photosynthesis as the primary process that underpins the majority of ecosystems, and provides students with an understanding of how ecosystems work. 

 

What climate change is and how it will lead to extinction of species or evolution by natural selection, 

 

Students will be able to evaluate the evidence that supports the theory of climate change.

 

Students will appreciate how scientific understanding can make us aware of our responsibilities as stewards of the environment. 

 

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • A study on the ecology of a habitat,

  • Investigating photosynthesis using isolated chloroplasts

  • Investigating the effect of temperature on the initial rate of an enzyme-catalysed reaction

  • Investigate the effects of temperature on the development of organisms

 

Topic 6 - Immunity, Infection and Forensics

How forensic pathologists use a wide variety of analytical techniques to determine identity and the time and cause of death of an organism 

How bacteria and viruses use a variety of routes into their hosts and how hosts have evolved barriers and internal mechanisms to combat infections. 

Exploring the evolutionary battles that take place between invading pathogens and their hosts. and  hospital acquired infections, their prevention and control.

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Use gel electrophoresis to separate DNA fragments of different length.

  • Investigate the effect of different antibiotics on bacteria.

 

Topic 7 - Run for your life

The physiological adaptations that enable animals and humans, particularly sports people, to undertake strenuous exercise. 

The links between an animal’s physiology and its performance. The biochemical requirements for respiration and the links between homeostasis, muscle physiology and performance. 

 

How medical technology is enabling more people to participate in sport, and raising the issue of whether the use of performance-enhancing substances by athletes can be justified. 

 

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Investigating rate of respiration.

  • Investigating the effects of exercise on tidal volume, breathing rate, respiratory minute ventilation and oxygen consumption using data from spirometer traces

 

Topic 8 - Grey matter

How the working of the nervous system enables us to see. An understanding of brain structure and functioning is relevant to issues such as the response to stimuli, the development of vision and learning. Brain imaging and the regions of the brain are also considered. 

 

Exploring how imbalances in brain chemicals may result in conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, which can be treated with suitable drugs. 

Students will discuss the ethical issues raised by the Human Genome Project and the risks and benefits of using genetically modified organisms. 

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic in order to develop their practical skills. This includes:

  • Investigating habituation to a stimulus.


 

Chemistry

Chemistry is an extremely challenging A Level and as such is highly regarded by Universities. It is often considered a requirement when applying for the more competitive applied science courses such as Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Sciences, but is equally highly regarded by a number of courses including Engineering and Biomedical Sciences. 

 

Entry Requirements:

  • Grade 6 in GCSE Chemistry or 6,6 in GCSE Combined Science

  • Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics

 

Course Content:

Students will follow the Edexcel A2 Chemistry Course:

 

Year 12:

  1. Atomic Structure

  2. Bonding and Structure 

  3. Redox I

  4. Inorganic Periodicity

  5. Quantitative Chemistry

  6. Organic Chemistry I

  7. Analytical Techniques I

  8. Energetics I

  9. Kinetics I

  10. Equilibrium I

Year 13:

  1. Equilibrium II

  2. Acid-Base Equilibria

  3. Energetics II

  4. Redox II

  5. Transition Metals

  6. Kinetics II

  7. Organic Chemistry II

  8. Organic Chemistry III

  9. Analytical Techniques II

 

Assessment:

This is assessed in Year 13 across 3 exams:

  • Paper 1: Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry (90 marks)

  • Paper 2: Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry (90 marks)

  • Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry (120 marks)

A separate practical endorsement will also be awarded as either Pass or Fail. This is based on practical assessments over the two year course.

There are a number of internal assessments over the two year course, most notably a UCAS prediction exam at the end of Year 12 based on the first year of study.

 

Physics:

 

At A-level physics, our students follow the Kerboodle AQA Scheme for Learning. This Scheme allows students to access many online resources to assist them in their learning, as well as mini online tests and tutorial videos.

The structure of the course is delivered as follows:

Year 12

  • Section 1: Particles and radiation

  • Section 2: Waves and optics

  • Section 3: Mechanics and materials

  • Section 4: Electricity

  • Section 5: Further Mechanics

  • Section 6: Thermal Physics

 

Year 13

  • Section 7: Fields

  • Section 8: Nuclear Physics

  • Section 9: Turning Points

  • Section 10: Astrophysics

 

Assessment:

AQA A-level physics is assessed in the summer of Year 13 across 3 exams:

  • Paper 1: Sections 1-5 (85 marks)

  • Paper 2: Section 7+8 and assumed knowledge from Sections 1-6 (85 marks)

  • Paper 3 (80 marks)
    Section A - Practical skills and data analysis
    Section B – Choice of one section from 9, 10, 11, 12 or 13

 

A separate practical endorsement will also be awarded as either Pass or Fail. This is based on practical assessments over the two year course.

There are a number of internal assessments over the two year course, most notably a UCAS prediction exam at the end of Year 12 based on the first year of study.

'The Big Picture' Curriculum Map

'The Big Picture' Curriculum Map

This document will provide a visual overview of the department's curriculum from Key Stages 3 to 5. This is in a student-friendly format to support them in their understanding the of the department's curriculum. 

Assessment

Department Assessment Matrix

This document will provide an overview for assessment for Key Stages 3, 4 and 5.

 

Key Stage 3 Judgement Descriptors

This document will give you an overview of the criteria for Emerging, Developing, Secure and Mastery judgements at KS3 for this subject.

How can you help your child succeed in the sciences?

 

Q&A Flashcards are a great way for parents to get involved with their children's learning in science. 

Helpful websites and further information

KS3 Science

Seneca - https://www.senecalearning.com/

Sign up for free and add the KS3 Science Course. Great for easy recap and revision with some learning checks along the way. 

Educake - www.educake.co.uk

Students are given- questions through this website to complete in class or as home-learning. Students can even set themselves their own tests and choose the difficulty of questions.

 

KS4 (All Sciences)

Schoology- www.schoology.com 

Students are given access to this in the last term of Y11. This contains powerpoints from teachers lessons, as well as links to exam questions and Topic Checklists. If a student does not have access, they must see Mr. Hayyan or Mrs. Leithead?

Tiny-cards - https://tinycards.duolingo.com/

By following this link https://tiny.cards/collections/2qrbeD9c/aqa-biology-gcse students can find Mr Groom’s profile where hundreds of flash cards have been made  for the Biology GCSE course, broken down by topic. This can be accessed on any device including their mobile phones, where they can download the app, for quick and easy on-the-go revision. It will work best if they make a free account.

Educake - www.educake.co.uk

Students are given- questions through this website to complete in class or as home-learning. Students can even set themselves their own tests and choose the difficulty of questions.

Isaac Physics - www,isaacphysics.org/ 

Students can attempt more in depth physics questions through this website compared to Educake. For support with this website, students should see Mr. Metcalfe.


 

KS5

Biology

Schoology- www.schoology.com 

All students have access to the A-level Biology course on Schoology from the start of Y12. Here students will find teacher powerpoints, worksheets, exam questions by topic, quick quizzes and more.

Tiny-cards - https://tinycards.duolingo.com/

By following this link https://tiny.cards/collections/2r3Ag5W8/snab-a-level  students can find hundreds of premade flashcards for their course, broken down by topic which can be used on any device including their mobile phones, for quick and easy on-the-go revision. It works best when students make a free account, and download the app to their phone. 

Chemistry

Edexcel website:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/chemistry-2015.html This website can be used to download the course specificiation, relevant documents and the most recent past papers.

Physics and Maths tutor:

https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/chemistry-revision/a-level-edexcel/ This is a wonderful resource, with a very large bank of topic specific past paper questions. This is a great way to augment your consolidation.

Chemguide:

https://www.chemguide.co.uk/ This is a great resource, written by an experienced chemistry teacher, who can offer an alternative explanation to lesson notes and revision guides.

Physics

Kerboodle - www.kerboodle.com/ 

Here students will find topic checklists, worksheets and core practical guidance for their AQA course.

Isaac Physics - www,isaacphysics.org/ 

For support with this website, students should see the Head of Physics.